Aby Kaupang Poetry: Selections from 13 WORDS

In the month following Donald Trump’s election to President of the United States, the Southern Poverty Law Center received over 1,094 reports of hate crimes. A burst of hate. The following poems were written with the assistance of the Hate on Display database through the Anti-defamation League’s website and in-part for the Holter Museum of Art’s traveling exhibition, Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, which travelled through my hometown of Fort Collins in January 2017. The exhibit was birthed in 2004 when copies of the Creativity Movement’s—a virulent white supremacist group—“bibles” landed in the hands of artists who were asked to “respond to, integrate or transform” the racist books in provocative ways. The following poems seek to simultaneously educate readers on frequent hate symbols and acronyms which now pollute the world around us, as well as to transform the language of hate.

 

 

Parentheses

reshape nest

a serpent she tears a sprees then   ashes    ten per rape he’s sent
reap he nests    pears he sent              reap she nets   era she spent
eras he spent
heaps resent       hearse spent

paths serene     neat spheres

shapes enter

aspens there anthers seep  panthers see

 

asters

 

Multiple parentheses—or the “echo,”—is a typographical practice used by anti-Semites online to denote the being or thought inside the parentheses is Jewish. Ex:(((Natalie Weiss))). The use of the echo was relatively uncommon, but in the spring of 2016, anti-Semites began using the echo when responding to or retweeting Jewish journalists, or journalists thought to be Jewish, which brought more attention to the practice. Anti-Semites began using inverted parentheses themselves, on their own screen names, to indicate that they were not Jewish or were anti-Jewish.

 

 

RAHOWA
RaHoWa

a war oh!

a war ho!
a raw oh

a rah ow

a hora

aha!

row

 

RAHOWA is an acronym for “Racial Holy War,” a term created by the Creativity Movement, a white supremacist pseudo-religion, as a rallying cry for the white supremacist cause. Over the years, its usage spread beyond Creativity Movement members into the broader white supremacist movement.

 

 

Bound for Glory

Long Body Furor       Born Dourly Fog        Furor Bony Gold

 

Goodby Fur Lorn

Blond Four Orgy
Bloody Frog Run
Bold Furry Goon
Bond Furor Logy
Bod Forlorn Guy
Bod Flurry Goon
Broody Flog Run
Broody Flog Urn
Body Floor Rung

Bong Dolor Fury

Nobly Dog Furor
Nobly God Furor
Nobly Gourd Fro
Nobly Gourd For
Nobly Drug Roof
Nobly Dour Frog

Burn Flood Orgy
Burn Flood Gory

Burn Godly Roof
Burn Goodly Fro
Burn Goodly For
Burn Godly Roof
Burn Drool Fogy
Burn Dolor Fogy
Burn Lord Goofy

Boo Dong Flurry
Boo Dry Furlong

Bold Urn Of Orgy

Bold Urn Of Gory
Born Old Fury Go    Born Do For Ugly

Body Flog Run Or Blood Fry Gun Or Body For Lung Or
Rob Found Glory
Rob Ungodly
Rob Ungodly

Drub Of Glory On
Drub Of Glory On
Drub Of Glory On

 

Bound for Glory is the name of an African-American hymnal co-opted by a longstanding white power music band (dating back to 1989) from Minneapolis. It is popular among white supremacists.

 

 

 

Hangman’s Noose

hangman noose
hosanna gnomes
hosannas gnome
nonage hansoms
nonages hansom
manage hon sons
manage nosh son
manage nosh no
manage hons son
manage hons nos
manages hon so
manages hon no
manages nosh no
manages nosh on
manages hons no
manages hons on
seaman hong son
seaman hong no
seaman song hon

hangman eon sos
hangman one sos
hangman eons so
hangman nose so
hangman noes so
hangman ones so
ghana omen sons
ghana meson son
ghana meson nos
ghana omens son
ghana omens nos
ghana mesons no
ghana mesons on
ghana ems noons
ghana mess noon

ghana none moss
ghana neon moss
ghana neons oms
ghana ens moons
ghana ens monos
shaman gone son
shaman gone nos
shaman en goons
shaman neons go
shaman eon song
shaman one song
shaman ens goon
shamans gone no
shamans gone on
shamans en goon
shamans none go
shamans neon go

hosanna gem son
hosanna gem nos
hosanna gems no
hosanna gems on
hosanna gone ms
hosanna em song
hosanna me song
hosanna en smog
hosannas gem no
hosannas gem on
hosannas men go

manna egos nosh
manna egos hons
manna goes nosh
manna goes hons
manna noshes go

manna hens goos
manna hoe songs
manna hose song
manna hoes song
manna shoe song
manna she goons
manna hes goons
manna shes goon
manna eons gos
manna eons hogs
manna nose gosh
manna nose hogs
manna noes gosh
manna noes hogs
manna ones gosh
manna ones hogs
manna noses ho
mannas gone
ohs
mannas gone ho
mannas ego nosh
mannas ego hons
mannas egos hon
mannas goes hon
mannas he goons
mannas eh goons
mannas hen goos
mannas shone go
mannas hones go
mannas hens go
mannas hoe song
mannas she goon
mannas hes goon
mannas eons

gosh

 

The hangman’s noose has come to be one of the most powerful visual symbols directed against African-Americans. Its origins are connected to the history of lynching in America. The columns within this poem are set to resemble the series of columns at the new lynching museum in Alabama, each representing a county where “racial terror lynchings” took place. The columns at the museum, each hauntingly bearing the names of the victims, will eventually be placed in the county of origin.

 

 

Fourteen Thirteen Words
for the 21st century

We must secure the existence
of our people planet and secure
a future for white all children.

 

14 is numerical shorthand for the white supremacist slogan known as the 14 Words: We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.

 

 

***

Aby Kaupang is the author of, most recently, NOS, disorder not otherwise specified (with Matthew Cooperman, Futurepoem, 2017), Disorder 299.00 (with Matthew Cooperman, Essay Press, 2016), Little “g” God Grows Tired of Me (SpringGun, 2013), Absence is Such a Transparent House (Tebot Bach, 2011), and Scenic Fences | Houses Innumerable (Scantily Clad Press, 2008). She holds master’s degrees in both Creative Writing and Occupational Therapy and lives in Fort Collins where she served as the Poet Laureate from 2015-2017. More information can be found at abykaupang.com.

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